Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Top Ten Tuesday - Freebie Week


Today's Top Ten Tuesday over at The Broke and the Bookish is an open-ended list.  
At first I thought, nah, I'll just skip it because nothing really jumped out at me on the list of past lists.  
But then this morning as I was adding a bazillion more books to my Amazon WishList while scanning blogs, I realized the Top Ten Books on my Amazon WishList could be my topic. 
So, there you have it.
Today's top ten list is the Top Ten Books on my Amazon WishList (which is really the top ten books most recently added to my Amazon WishList).  
If I had a dollar for every time I used the word "list" in this post, I'd be rich :/
Oy.

1. American Gypsy: A Memoir by Oksana Marafioti - added just this morning after reading today's edition of Shelf Awareness


From Amazon:
A vivid and funny memoir about growing up Gypsy and becoming American

Fifteen-year-old Oksana Marafioti is a Gypsy. This means touring with the family band from the Mongolian deserts to the Siberian tundra. It means getting your hair cut in “the Lioness.” It also means enduring sneering racism from every segment of Soviet society. Her father is determined that his girls lead a better, freer life. In America! Also, he wants to play guitar with B. B. King. And cure cancer with his personal magnetism. All of this he confides to the woman at the American embassy, who inexplicably allows the family entry. Soon they are living on the sketchier side of Hollywood.

What little Oksana and her sister, Roxy, know of the United States they’ve learned from MTV, subcategory George Michael. It doesn’t quite prepare them for the challenges of immigration. Why are the glamorous Kraft Singles individually wrapped? Are the little soaps in the motels really free? How do you protect your nice new boyfriend from your opinionated father, who wants you to marry decently, within the clan?

In this affecting, hilarious memoir, Marafioti cracks open the secretive world of the Roma and brings the absurdities, miscommunications, and unpredictable victories of the immigrant experience to life. With unsentimentally perfect pitch, American Gypsy reveals how Marafioti adjusted to her new life in America, one slice of processed cheese at a time.



2.  Monkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety by Daniel Smith - also added this morning from Shelf Awareness



From Amazon: 
Anxiety once paralyzed Daniel Smith over a roast beef sandwich, convincing him that a choice between ketchup and barbeque sauce was as dire as that between life and death. It has caused him to chew his cuticles until they bled, wear sweat pads in his armpits, and confess his sexual problems to his psychotherapist mother. It has dogged his days, threatened his sanity, and ruined his relationships.
In Monkey Mind, Smith articulates what it is like to live with anxiety, defanging the disease with humor, traveling through its demonic layers, and evocatively expressing its self-destructive absurdities and painful internal coherence. With honesty and wit, he exposes anxiety as a pudgy, weak-willed wizard behind a curtain of dread and tames what has always seemed to him, and to the tens of millions of others who suffer from anxiety, a terrible affliction.
Aaron Beck, the most influential doctor in modern psychotherapy, says that “Monkey Mind does for anxiety what William Styron’s Darkness Visible did for depression.” Neurologist and bestselling writer Oliver Sacks says, “I read Monkey Mind with admiration for its bravery and clarity. . . . I broke out into explosive laughter again and again.” Here, finally, comes relief and recognition to all those who want someone to put what they feel, or what their loved ones feel, into words.


3.  Flight from Berlin by David John - picked this one off Five Alarm Book Reviews "New Releases this Week" post.


From Amazon:
August 1936: The eyes of the world are on Berlin, where Adolf Hitler is using the Olympic Games to showcase his powerful new regime. Cynical British journalist Richard Denham knows that the carefully staged spectacle masks the Nazis’ ruthless brutality, and he’s determined to report the truth.
Sparks fly when the seasoned newspaperman meets the beautiful and rebellious American socialite Eleanor Emerson. A superb athlete whose brash behavior got her expelled from the U.S. Olympic swim team, Eleanor is now covering the games as a celebrity columnist for newspapers in the States. While Berlin welcomes the world, the Nazi capital becomes a terrifying place for Richard and Eleanor. Their chance encounter at a reception thrown by propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels leads them into the center of a treacherous game involving the Gestapo and the British Secret Intelligence Service. At stake: a mysterious dossier that threatens to destroy the leadership of the Third Reich.
Drawn together by danger and passion, surrounded by enemies, Richard and Eleanor must pull off a daring plan to survive. But one wrong move could be their last.
Set in America and Europe, David John’s Flight from Berlin is a masterful blend of fact and fiction, drama and suspense. A riveting story of love, courage, and betrayal that culminates in a breathtaking race against the forces of evil, it will keep you spellbound until its thrilling end.

4.  A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness - everybody's been talking about this one with today's release of the sequel - I'm dying to get into this.




From Amazon:
"A wonderfully imaginative grown-up fantasy with all the magic of Harry Potter and Twilight."

-People

In a sparkling debut, A Discovery of Witches became the "it" book of early 2011, bringing Deborah Harkness into the spotlight and galvanizing fans around the world. In this tale of passion and obsession, Diana Bishop, a young scholar and the descendant of witches, discovers a long-lost and enchanted alchemical manuscript deep in Oxford's Bodleian Library. Its reappearance summons a fantastical underworld, which she navigates with her leading man, vampire geneticist Matthew Clairmont. Harkness has created a universe to rival those of Anne Rice, Diana Gabaldon, and Elizabeth Kostova, and she adds a scholar's depth to this riveting story of magic and suspense. And the story continues in Book Two, Shadow of Night.

5.  Shadow of Night by Deborah Harkness - released just today and is all over the media...if you've missed hearing about this one, you must be a hermit.



From Amazon:
"Together we lifted our feet and stepped into the unknown"—the thrilling sequel to the New York Times bestseller A Discovery of Witches
Deborah Harkness exploded onto the literary scene with her debut novel, A Discovery of Witches, Book One of the magical All Souls Trilogy and an international publishing phenomenon. The novel introduced Diana Bishop, Oxford scholar and reluctant witch, and the handsome geneticist and vampire Matthew Clairmont; together they found themselves at the center of a supernatural battle over an enchanted manuscript known as Ashmole 782.
Now, picking up from A Discovery of Witches’ cliffhanger ending, Shadow of Night plunges Diana and Matthew into Elizabethan London, a world of spies, subterfuge, and a coterie of Matthew’s old friends, the mysterious School of Night that includes Christopher Marlowe and Walter Raleigh. Here, Diana must locate a witch to tutor her in magic, Matthew is forced to confront a past he thought he had put to rest, and the mystery of Ashmole 782 deepens.
Deborah Harkness has crafted a gripping journey through a world of alchemy, time travel, and magical discoveries, delivering one of the most hotly anticipated novels of the season.

6.  The Thread by Victoria Hislop - another one from Five Alarm Book Reviews "New Releases"




From Amazon
From the internationally acclaimed author of The Island and The Return comes a sweeping and unforgettable story of love and friendship and the choices that must be made when loyalties are challenged.
Thessaloniki, Greece, 1917: As Dimitri Komninos is born, a fire sweeps through the thriving multicultural city where Christians, Jews, and Muslims live side by side. It is the first of many catastrophic events that will forever change this place and its people. Five years later, as the Turkish army pushes west through Asia Minor, young Katerina loses her mother in the crowd of refugees clambering for boats to Greece. Landing in Thessaloniki's harbor, she is at the mercy of strangers in an unknown city. For the next eighty years, the lives of Dimitri and Katerina will be entwined with each other and—through Nazi occupation, civil war, persecution, and economic collapse—with the story of their homeland.
Thessaloniki, Greece, 2007: A young Anglo-Greek hears his grandparents' remarkable story for the first time and understands he has a decision to make. For decades, Dimitri and Katerina have looked after the treasures of those who have been forced from their beloved city. Should he stay and become their new custodian?

7.  The Orchid House by Lucinda Riley - ummm, I can't remember where this one came from :p




From Amazon:
Spanning from the 1930s to the present day, from the Wharton Park estate in England to Thailand, this sweeping novel tells the tale of a concert pianist and the aristocratic Crawford family, whose shocking secrets are revealed, leading to devastating consequences.

As a child, concert pianist Julia Forrester spent many idyllic hours in the hothouse of Wharton Park, the grand estate where her grandfather tended exotic orchids. Years later, while struggling with overwhelming grief over the death of her husband and young child, she returns to this tranquil place. There she reunites with Kit Crawford, heir to the estate and her possible salvation.
When they discover an old diary, Julia seeks out her grandmother to learn the truth behind a love affair that almost destroyed the estate. Their search takes them back to the 1940s when Harry, a former heir to Wharton Park, married his young society bride, Olivia, on the eve of World War II. When the two lovers are cruelly separated, the impact will be felt for generations to come.
This atmospheric story alternates between the magical world of Wharton Park and Thailand during World War II. Filled with twists and turns, passions and lies, and ultimately redemption, The Orchid House is a beautiful, romantic, and poignant novel.


8.  The Girl on the Cliff by Lucinda Riley - found this one on Unabridged Chick's Mailbox Monday just yesterday




From Amazon
From the author of the international bestseller The Orchid House, comes a mesmerizing story about two Irish families and the tangled ties that have bound them since World War I.
Escaping a recent heartbreak in New York, Grania Ryan returns to her family home on the wind-swept coast of Ireland. During a walk on the edge of a cliff, she meets a young girl named Aurora Lisle who is about to profoundly change her.
     As their lives begin to intertwine, Grania’s mother becomes deeply troubled by the relationship. A century of entanglement and strife has brought nothing but tragedy to the Ryan and Lisle families, and the past is set to repeat its endless sorrows. But Grania’s curiosity about the joint histories of their familes won’t be stopped. After she finds a suitcase originally hidden in the attic of the magnificent Cadogan House in London during the First World War, Grania is taken back to 1914 where it all began. Ultimately, it will be Aurora’s intuition that has the power to break the family’s spell and unlock the chains of the past.
     Haunting, uplifting, and deeply moving, The Girl on the Cliff is an unforgettable tale of the triumph of hope over loss.

9.  Painter of Silence by Georgina Harding - another "don't remember"



From Amazon
It is the early 1950s. A nameless man is found on the steps of the hospital in Iasi, Romania. He is deaf and mute, but a young nurse named Safta recognizes him from the past and brings him paper and pencils so that he might draw. Gradually, memories appear on the page: the man is Augustin, the cook’s son at the manor house at Poiana, where Safta was the privileged daughter. Born six months apart, they had a connection that bypassed words, but while Augustin’s world stayed the same size, Safta’s expanded to embrace languages, society, and a fleeting love one long, hot summer. But then came war, and in its wake a brutal Stalinist regime, and nothing would remain the same.
Georgina Harding’s kaleidoscopic new novel will appeal to readers of Anne Michaels, Michael Ondaatje, and Sandor Marai. It is as intense and submerging as rain, as steeped in the horrors of our recent history as it is in the intimate passions of the human heart.

10.  Crossing on the Paris by Dana Gynther - another one from Unabridged Chick's Mailbox Monday.




From Amazon:
Downton Abbey meets Titanic in this sweeping historical novel about three women of different generations and classes, whose lives intersect on a majestic ocean liner traveling from Paris to New York in the wake of World War I.
The year is 1921. Three women set out on the impressive Paris ocean liner on a journey from Paris to New York. Julie Vernet is a young French woman from a working class family who has just gotten her first job as a crew worker on the ship. Escaping her small town and the memory of war, she longs for adventure on the high seas...
     Constance Stone is a young American wife and mother who has traveled to Paris to rescue her bohemian sister, Faith, who steadfastly refuses to return to America and settle down. Constance returns home to New York, having failed at the duty her father asked of her...
     Vera Sinclair, a rich, ex-patriate American is leaving France after thirty-one years to live out her remaining time home in America. Over the course of the transatlantic voyage, she reflects on her colorful life and looks forward to a quiet retirement. While each of these women come from different walks of life, their paths cross while at sea in a series of chance encounters. The powerful impact these disparate lives have on one another make for a magnificent and unforgettable read.


There you have it! My Top Ten (most recently added) books on my Amazon WishList! 

14 comments:

  1. Amazon is a good place to go and wish. I used to meet up with you when I played Sepia Scenes. Are you still playing that? kaye—the road goes ever ever on

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    1. Kaye, I'm unfamiliar with Sepia Scenes. You must be thinking of someone else? Glad you stopped by all the same though :)

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  2. Such a wonderful choice for Top Ten Picks for today! I am going to add stuff from here!

    Here is my Top Ten post!

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  3. I can't wait to listen to the new Harkness book either! If you must buy one of these this week, Go for A Discovery of Witches! You will not be disappointed!

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    1. I'm going crazy listening to everyone talk about it so I'm going to have to get it soon!

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  4. Nothing wrong with airing out your lists! I have been wanting to read Discovery of Witches forever. It is too long for me to read in print, and my library only has it on MP3 (which means I'd have to listen only in the car). But Zibilee is saving the day because she is going to give it to me in a format that I can load on my iPod. So it will be coming soon!

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    1. I'm not sure why but I seem to do better with long books on my Nook...I cannot even begin to explain to you why that is so :/ I have a little credit left on an old giftcard and I'm trying to make my final choices wisely!

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  5. I loved A Discovery of Witches and can't wait to read the sequel too.

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    1. I've heard lots of good things! Can't wait!

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  6. Great wishlist! A Discovery of Witches wasn't really for me, but I know I'm in the minority with that opinion.

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    1. I think it's pretty interesting how different people like different books...sometimes even the "best" books other people like, the rest of us don't. Makes the world much more interesting I think :)

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  7. Great list! I just read about Monkey Mind yesterday (I think it was NPR) anyway, I thought I could seriously benefit from reading this one :)

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  8. Me too, Angela...I love the term "monkey mind"...it describes me perfectly sometimes :)

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